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of history. from early days, surge days, to drawdown days, to the current environment where we are actually watching from the completion of projects that were begun long ago, but also watching the strategic effects of u.s. engagement and disengagement. a very special position to be able to look at these things because the watchdog that ensures that u.s. tax dollars that are spent inside iraq are spent well and wisely. but it's also a wonderful for evaluating our changing mission and changing program in iraq precisely because as a public watchdog, as someone who looks at military projects from a civilian perspective, we -- he has the opportunity to talk about very many different problems, challenges and lessons learned that he's been able to work on over the past nine years. he's also the author, along with his team of learning from iraq, a book that i commend to you for reading, and for learning. and so with that introduction, please help me welcome stuart bowen. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, kim. thanks to the institute and to all of you for being here this morning. it's a privilege
by the army or the police or by the citizenry. don't wish to see a dupoly environment held by the state. there's no way to make a gun safe. host: what about the regulations? you talked about a serial number on every gun. you write about it in the story. tell our viewers. question aboute what happens if a gun comes out bad. , if it is beyond repair within the factory. the answer is that this is a heavily regulated area. the receiver which is the part of the gun that makes it a gun, it does the firing, it told the round and contains the trigger housing. every single one of those made has to have a serial number. even if it comes out broken. if it comes out broken, that have to take a picture of cutting it in half and then send that to the federal government if the federal government asks for it. they have to document it. it is not as if there are people popping in at night and stealing chocolate. this is already regulated industry. norfolk, va., independent college. about: you were talking having guns designed to kill people and animals. do they talk about the number of people who have been kill
and methane into the environment than if we hadn't done these regulations. gregg: and higher costs for consumersesome. >> no doubt about that. the biggest concern is not so much prices, but they will be affected, it's jobs. a lot of people in the coal mining industry, a lot of people in the manufacturing sector, and these are union jobs, by the way, gregg. very worried about what's going to happen to their job if we increase the prices and put, you know, one of the effects of this will be, essentially, to put coal mining out of business. gregg: all right. stephen moore, as always, thank you very much. >> thank you, gregg. gregg: in the meantime, new numbers showing president obama's approval rating has taken a serious dive since his re-election. coming up, we're going to speak with brit hume about what's really behind this decline. >>> plus, the defense in the george zimmerman trial getting its first full day right now on the witness stand a former coworker of zimmerman. the trial is streaming in full on foxnews.com. out there owning it. the ones getting involved and staying engage
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)